the be.come project x ROBINHILL Brand raffle

the be.come project x ROBINHILL Brand raffle

We introduced you to our client, Chelsea J. Stoneburg, a few weeks back in our “meet your demo babes” post. Chelsea has been with the be.come project since our beta days, is a model on our website, and has even been a demo 2 times now – it’s safe to say that the love is mutual. Chelsea has a company, ROBINHILL Brand, where she hand-paints beautiful pieces of clothing with inspiring and personalized messages. ROBINHILL Brand was created based on the idea that a jacket could act as a piece of armor against negativity and doubt. Chelsea makes jackets meant to empower the wearer & remind them that they are completely enough as is. the be.come project and ROBINHILL Brand are pairing up to raffle off 3 custom-made jackets, with 100% of proceeds being donated to Chelsea’s chosen charity, NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness).

GET YOUR RAFFLE TICKETS HERE

what you need to know:
  • Here’s the ticket pricing:
    • 10 Entries for $10
    • 30 Entries for $25
    • 50 Entries for $35
    • 75 Entries for $50
    • 200 Entries for $100
  • With unlimited entries, you can designate your tickets to the jacket of your choice!
  • Raffle runs from March 2nd through 11:59PM ET March 15, 2020 and winners will be drawn on March 16, 2020.
  • Proceeds will be donated to NAMI
  • There are 3 Jackets from ROBINHILL available for raffle:

“powerful as hell” custom denim jacket (L) – this piece was designed with the be.come project in mind; anybody else leave the mat feeling powerful as hell? Wear this ROBINHILL piece as a constant display of your power. This oversized denim jacket is a faded coral color; making the black & white detailing stand out.

Jacket Value: $225.00

“my own role model” custom denim jacket (3XL) – what if, instead of wanting to be Beyoncé when we grow up, we wanted to be our future selves? This ROBINHILL original was made to remind you that who you are & who you’re be.coming (pun intended) is more than enough. Wear this blue denim jacket with pride.

Jacket Value: $225.00

“total badass” custom vegan leather jacket (L) – …because you absolutely are one. This vegan leather jacket was designed to remind you of the complete & total badass that you are each and every day. Be as bold as the colors in this ROBINHILL jacket & feel good.

Jacket Value: $275.00

NAMI is the nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to building better lives for the millions of Americans affected by mental illness. NAMI provides advocacy, education, support and public awareness so that all individuals and families affected by mental illness can build better lives.

GET YOUR RAFFLE TICKETS HERE

Head to the NAMI website for more information HERE

Check out ROBINHILL Brand on Instagram HERE

*We felt it was very important that this endeavor be a raffle, not a silent auction, in order to give people of all income levels a chance to win, and a chance to support a good cause. A donation of just $10 will get you 10 entries to the jacket of your choice! We hope our efforts to be more inclusive in our philanthropy will end up yielding even more dollars for charity. Please share with your friends and family – the jackets are AWESOME.

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national eating disorders awareness

national eating disorders awareness

Contributed by Whitney Hull-Benson

Eating disorders are mental illnesses and are incredibly complex. There is no one “catch all” cause. Each disorder, and why it presents, varies greatly from person to person, and each disorder comes to be through many factors; be it biological, psychological, environmental, or a combination of all three.

The most common, known, and researched eating disorders are anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. However, there are many other examples of disordered eating which are not diagnosable…orthorexia (obsessive behavior in pursuit of a healthy diet), diabulimia (diabetics who restrict insulin for weight loss purposes), strict food philosophies for weight loss that live under the guise of “wellness”, rigid exercise routines and compensatory behavior, compulsive eating habits, harmful practices of heavy food restriction or cleansing when you “eat too much,” or “fall off the wagon” with your diet. Disordered eating habits are all around us.

The landscape of disordered eating is vast and complex as well. Our culture supports and encourages us to live in the uncertainty it has created, to live in fear of food, and to constantly question, if not completely ignore, what our body knows inherently. We are encouraged to wholeheartedly adopt the limited and biased understanding of nourishment our society has created, we are asked to change along with its every whim and new discovery (did you know in the 1970’s eating sugar was recommended for weight loss?), and we are told to blindly follow society’s ableist approach to “optimized health.”

It’s shameful that as a society we primarily learn about eating disorders through the stories of white, small, able-bodied, cis people who are frighteningly thin. These stories are real, and yes, these people deserve medical care, treatment, tenderness, understanding, and the chance to heal. What is unfortunate about this portrayal is that it is vastly misleading and affects the care of people who fall outside of that stereotype. Aka: eating disorders are rarely diagnosed to people in larger bodies…even less so if the patient is a person of color, disabled and/or transgendered. Eating disorders do not discriminate. They affect people of all ages, races, genders, and classes. Until we learn and acknowledge this fact, folks will continue to be misdiagnosed or ignored in our medical system when seeking informed and inclusive treatment.

Eating disorders and disordered eating disproportionately affect those with low socioeconomic status. This often means that LGBTQ+ and BIPOC (black, indigenous, people of color) communities are unfairly affected. Food scarcity can create abnormal eating behaviors, as can poor access to fresh food, fast food and affordability. These and many other byproducts of food deserts and low availability can create a host of health challenges. When we discuss eating disorders, we need to highlight the increased physical and emotional stress an individual who experiences oppression faces. This stress takes an incredible toll on the body, so the harm is NOT “just” the emotional relationship to food and one’s body, but also other health markers like blood pressure, digestive problems, depression, mood disorders, sleep problems, depressed immune systems, heart disease, and increased risk of diabetes. This is not exhaustive – the list of health implications when living in a stigmatized body is extensive.

When looking to treatment, not many people who have eating disorders or disordered eating can afford in-patient care, and if one can, understandably, there is a deep mistrust of our medical system. The experience a person has in medical settings differs greatly depending on the body that they show up in. This means that, more often than not, oppressed folks do not get the care or support that they need, let alone the proper diagnoses. Moreover, what happens when you have an eating disorder and are in fat body? *I use “fat” as a descriptive word* A fat person is much less likely to get the same care and concern in the treatment of an eating disorder that a thin bodied person *again I use thin as a descriptive word* is going to get in the treatment of an eating disorder.

"Eating disorders are a social justice issue."

- Gloria Lucas @nalgonapositivitypride

It is appalling that what is diagnosed as an eating disorder or disordered eating behaviors for a thin person is often prescribed by a health professional to a fat person for a health concern that is not correlated to their weight, as most if not all are not. This is called the weight bias or weight-based discrimination.

It is important to say that for many folks an eating disorder can begin as a coping mechanism. On the onset, the behavior may invoke a sense of control and autonomy, or it can be an escape or a numbing from a life experience, be it past or current. It is common for there to be co-occurring mental health challenges at play like anxiety, depression, substance abuse, obsessive compulsive disorder, and PTSD, just to name a few.

Eating disorders are complex and multifaceted. It is worth noting that they cannot be “cured” by self-love reminders on social media alone, though curating your feed is one of my first lines of defense for those who are struggling.

According to NEDA, over 30 million people in the United States suffer from eating disorders, and those are just the folks who actively seek professional help and are properly diagnosed.

Our newfound “health optimization” obsession (aka wellness culture) is making this all much more complicated and much worse. The terrifying truth of wellness culture is that it is diet culture, rebranded. This makes it more palatable to the masses and more insidious in nature. I’m willing to bet that the new “wellness” lifestyle brand showing up in your feed is still pushing the agenda that thin = health and fat = lack of health, and that we are in complete control of how our bodies look. Eighty percent of our body’s size and shape is determined by genetics. Why do we allow for variety when it comes to nature, animals and other cultures, but in our white patriarchal system we continue to hold fast to a singular standard of beauty and health?

The thin white ideal is making the vast majority incredibly unwell. 


There is no neat and tidy way to discuss eating disorders. They are terrifying, isolating, all-consuming, subliminally and not so subliminally encouraged. They are fueled by capitalism, white normativity and “beauty” as social currency. It’s a slippery slope from disordered eating behavior to full-blown eating disorder. I believe that the vast majority of people have experienced disordered eating at some point in their lives or know someone who is severely affected by this backwards, unethical health paradigm.

    • Would eating disorders exist if fatphobia didn’t exist?

    • Would eating disorders exist if we were taught to listen to our body’s needs, wants and desires?

    • Would eating disorders exist if being thin and “beautiful” didn’t also equal social currency?

    • Would eating disorders exist if there were true health equity?

    • Would eating disorders exist if all spaces were accessible, and if we were encouraged to honor and be proud of all the unique and varied ways we show up in this world?
whitney photo

Eating disorders are complex.

If you are currently struggling with disordered eating or an eating disorder, or know someone who is, please reach out to a professional who can assist you. I suggest looking for therapists, counselors, dieticians and nutritionists who specialize or focus in eating disorders and disordered eating. Look for those who work with or are certified in Intuitive Eating, HAES, and Body Trust.

Please visit my website for more information on my approach www.innatenutritionist.com. I offer free consultations, 20% off appointments for be.come project folks, and a sliding scale if needed. I offer appointments online or in person in Portland, Or. I am also happy to help you find a practitioner in your area who might be a better fit depending on your needs etc.

You have the right to define health as it pertains to you, and you have the inherent right to love and live fully in the body you have, just as it is.

Resources

https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/screening-tool

https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/help-support/contact-helpline

Books

The Body Is Not An Apology – Sonya Renee Taylor

Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body – Roxane Gay

A Hunger So Wide & So Deep: A Multiracial View of Women’s Eating Problems – Becky Thompson

Intuitive Eating 3rd Edition – Evelyn Tribole & Elyse Resch

You Have the Right to Remain Fat – Virgie Tovar

Pleasure Activism – Adrienne Maree Brown

The Gifts of Imperfection – Brené Brown

Beyond a Shadow of a Diet – Judith Matz & Ellen Frankel

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a love letter ll from me to me

a love letter ll from me to me

 

Dear Me,

I know today you might feel alone. You might feel lost or undeserving.

Maybe you woke up and asked yourself, “Am I enough?” or “Am I worthy of my own love?”

Maybe you can’t answer those questions…at least not yet. Maybe you’ve avoided asking yourself them in the first place, out of fear for the answers you would give. Maybe, secretly, you’ve wondered whether you deserve to have the life you covet. And maybe, just maybe, you’re still learning what love, specifically self-love, means to you.

quote for vday pyho

They say it takes 10,000 hours to master something and we believe them when it comes to playing an instrument, discovering a new language or picking up a sport. But when it comes to learning to love ourselves, we expect it to be inherent. The truth is, it’s a process. And like many skills and passions we will perfect in our lifetimes, it will take incredibly hard work and relentless practice. It will likely happen slowly, maybe when you’re not paying attention, but day by day you’ll come closer to finding your value. Seeing your faults but choosing to advocate for your strengths. Celebrating the things you do right and forgiving yourself for the times you fall short. Finding compassion for yourself when you couldn’t find it within you to treat yourself with kindness. The same kindness you so often show to your family and friends.

What would happen if you spoke to yourself with the same gentleness and sincerity as you do the people you care for?

Why is the love we give to others so different from the love we show ourselves? When someone you love is having a bad day, you’re the first person to jump up and assure them that they haven’t failed and they haven’t disappointed. What would happen if you spoke to yourself with the same gentleness and sincerity as you do the people you care for? In what ways could your life get better with a simple act of grace?

On this day about love, and every day moving forward, I challenge you to be honest about how you want to spend your days and who you want to spend them with. And I encourage you to make sure you’re always on your own list. 

You are enough. You are worthy of your own love. Let this letter serve as a reminder. And if you still need more time to get there… If you need the full 10,000 hours… Take it. Take what you need. I’ll be waiting on the other side.

Love,

Me

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meet your demo babes ll chelsea & laurie share

meet your demo babes ll chelsea & laurie share

Chelsea shares:

How long have you been be.coming?

I’ve been be.coming since the beta project!

Tell us about your experience as a demo babe.

This was my second time being a demo and, somehow, it was even more exciting than the first time. Bethany and their team made me feel completely comfortable and strong in my body at every turn. There is a palpable energy in the studio that is really extraordinary. Everyone is there working towards the same goal. We were all working together to make this thing happen. It was simultaneously exhausting and empowering, which is hard to accomplish!

On top of that, this experience was special to me because Bethany showed how much faith they had in me as a business owner. Getting to collaborate with the be.come project and give back in the process was more than I could have asked for. From the start, Bethany was a total champion of mine, which truly made all the difference. 

How has the be.come project helped you?

I still find new ways that the be.come project has helped me even after all this time. Some days, it helps me to manage my stress. Other days, it reminds me that I am completely enough in this body that I was given; and truthfully, some days, I do the routines and finish just as annoyed, angry, or sad as I was when I started. This reminds me that there is no wrong way to respond to moving your body, which I think is important too. 

How would your best friend describe you in five words?

Fearless. Resilient. Selfless. Energetic. Genuine.

What is your favorite…

be.come move – The twisted side plank will forever amaze me. 

part of your be.come session – It really is crazy how incredibly therapeutic kissing your shoulders or thanking your body for just moving that day can be. 

thing you see in a be.come session – Every body type out there is represented.

Laurie shares:

How did you find the be.come project?

I followed Bethany through their time at SLT, during which, I tried to talk myself into going, but decided against it because I convinced myself I would end up a pretzel on the transformer.

Fast-forward a few years, I saw Bethany had started an in-studio class here in NYC and once again was working up the courage to go in. So on November 14, 2017, I took the plunge and stopped by their class. I enjoyed myself so much that I quickly returned. I was borderline fainting in class 2, but was reassured by Bethany not to be embarrassed, and to keep trying even if that meant taking breaks. I’ve been with the be.come project since before the app and I’ve loved it for that reason…its ok to take a break; it’s normal to need to do a move in an alternative way if that’s what your body needs; it’s ok to wear what is comfortable; it’s ok to be nervous; it’s ok to wobble; it’s ok to just be you. 

How has the be.come project helped you? 

CONFIDENCE!!! 

Tell us about your experience as a demo babe.

I was lucky enough to take part in the photo shoot in April of 2018 before becoming a demo babe. The photo shoot was the most out of the box thing I have ever agreed to, but it was amazing connecting with other be.comers, and we are still friends to this day. Going into both the photo shoot and the demo shoot, I felt nervous, anxious, and scared of how the world might judge me or my body. They are very intimate experiences; in one instance, I was in a bra and underwear, and in the other, I was on video where every misstep I made was being captured. There was no hiding. Fortunately, Bethany has this innate way of putting your mind at ease with their constant encouragements, and so everything just fades away. Leaving both experiences, I felt strong, free, and confident in not caring what people would think; it wasn’t for them, it was for me. 

What is your favorite…

be.come move– facing the side, arms in prayer, back leg bent, front leg straight with the foot flexed. 

part of your be.come session– the bridge because you are halfway there! 

place to be.come- In-studio with Bethany 

thanks chelsea & laurie for sharing! you can follow chelsea @robinhillbrand and laurie @chickenstix104

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